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Fastest Runners in the Cricket World : Cricfare

Fastest Runners in the Cricket World : Cricfare


Here are 10 of the fastest in that list, in no particular order.

 

 

  1. MS Dhoni

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (pronunciation  born 7 July 1981), commonly known as MS Dhoni, is an Indian international cricketer who captained the Indian national team in limited-overs formats from 2007 to 2016 and in Test cricket from 2008 to 2014. Under his captaincy, India won the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, the 2010 and 2016 Asia Cups, the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup and the 2013 ICC Champions Trophy. A right-handed middle-order batsman and wicket-keeper, Dhoni is one of the highest run-scorers in One Day Internationals (ODIs) with more than 10,000 runs scored and is considered an effective "finisher" in limited-overs formats is also regarded by some as one of the best wicket-keepers and captain in modern limited-overs international cricket.

Speed and Dhoni must be first cousins, to sum up their affinity towards each other. For a beefy man, Dhoni pummels the pitch to submission in his all-out hurtles as he converts singles to doubles and further on with unbelievable efficiency. Athletic ability is the bulwark of his game and what makes him special is his diligent fitness regimes to ensure he delays the effects of aging.

In the era where a dive is a pardonable excess, Dhoni’s sure-footed methods behind the stumps and his alacrity in accepting opportunities to squeeze in the extra run have given India the insurance against some of their persistent shortcomings. …and Dhoni clatters away like a train in a great rush!

  1. Andrew Symonds

Andrew Symonds (born 9 June 1975) is a former Australian international cricketer, who played all three formats as a batting all-rounder. He was an important member of two-time World Cup-winning squads. Symonds is a right-handed, middle-order batsman and alternates between medium pace and off-spin bowling. He is also notable for his exceptional fielding skills.

Symonds was built like a truck, but sprinted like a Mustang when he needed to. There were a surge and an unbelievable amount of acceleration that he could impart to himself at the drop of a hat. His hard-hitting strokes and competitive nature shall occupy most of the space is a tribute written to him, but Symonds wouldn’t be the cricketer he was if he wasn’t so fast on the field.

Immense running prowess, imperious dives, cannon-like throws and the belief that the ball beating him was unacceptable made him one of the swiftest men to ever walk onto a cricket field.

  1.  Herschelle Gibbs

Herschelle Herman Gibbs (born 23 February 1974) is a South African former cricketer, who played all formats of the game for fourteen years. A right-handed batsman mostly opened the batting, Gibbs became the first player to hit six consecutive sixes in one over in One Day International (ODI) cricket, doing so against the Netherlands in the 2007 Cricket World Cup.

There are batsmen and there is Gibbs, there are fielders and there too, there is Gibbs. He was the flamboyance that bolstered the confidence of a resurgent Proteas setup. His batting had the callousness of a rock band, his fielding - the precision of a surgeon.

As Shaun Pollock galloped into his delivery stride, Gibbs would be seen prancing in, licking his fingers while his eyes remained set on the ball. He made backward point his backyard - his speed and accuracy meant that a lot of the short and wide garbage that bowlers dished out once in a while had the cover of Gibbs’ impregnable fielding and unassailable speed.

It’s too sad that he is remembered most for having dropped Steve Waugh in the famous semi-final of the 1999 World Cup.

  1.  AB de Villiers

Abraham Benjamin de Villiers (born 17 February 1984), commonly known as AB de Villiers, Mr. 360° or simply AB, is a South African cricketer. He is considered one of the greatest batsmen of all time. He plays for Tshwane Spartans in Mzansi Super League and Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League. In limited-overs cricket he is an attacking batsman.[2] He was named as the ICC ODI Player of the Year three times during his 15-year international career. His name was also featured in Wisden Cricketers of the Decade at the end of 2019.

Can Mr. Omnipotent not be able to do something? When he gave up wicket keeping, De Villiers showed how belligerent he could be while fielding too. He manufactured run-outs from the raw material of impossibility, he plucked the ball suddenly, right as it was about to sail over the boundary, he dived like a swimmer would into a round of heats – all to show the world how incredible a sportsperson he is.

He remains one among the fastest to have ever played the game - be it his strike rate or his speed while chasing a cricket ball.

  1.  Mohammad Kaif

Mohammad Kaif ( pronunciation (help•info)) (born 1 December 1980) is a former Indian cricketer, who played Tests and ODIs.[1] He made it to the national team on the strength of his performances at the Under-19 level, where he captained the India national under-19 cricket team to victory in the Under-19 World Cup in 2000.

A diminutive presence that could easily miss the eye until one saw him in the field was Mohammed Kaif. He ushered the Indian team into an era of great athleticism. Physically frail as he was, his ability to sprint unrelentingly was shocking, as was his eye that never looked away from the ball.

If the ball beat him, it had to be an extremely good shot. If a fielder stopped him from sneaking in a run, he had to be a very good one. His contribution to India’s ODI cricket has been signed yet thoroughly undermined. In a country obsessed with batting and which takes to bowling as a hobby, Kaif holds the rare distinction of earning immense respect plainly through his athleticism on the field.

  1.  Dwayne Bravo

Dwayne John Bravo (born 7 October 1983) is a Trinidadian cricketer, who played all formats of the game and a former captain of West Indies in all formats and plays league cricket for Chennai Super Kings & Quetta Gladiators. A genuine all-rounder, Bravo bats right-handed and bowls right-arm medium-fast pace. He is particularly known for his aggressive batting in the middle order, and for his "at the death" bowling. He is also known for his variety of lengths he can bowl at. He also performs as a singer

Between the frenzied rituals of slower balls, crazy shots, the overt glitz and the dance, Dwayne Bravo does some unimaginable feats on the field of play. He scurries across the outfield, chasing the ball and flinging himself around without a care in the world.

No angle is too obtuse for a Dwayne Bravo humming his version of cricket, be it his shots or be it his fielding. Most batsmen know that there’s no chance of stealing an extra run when dear Dwayne is after the ball. Period.

  1.  Jonty Rhodes

Jonathan Neil Rhodes (born 27 July 1969) is a South African cricket commentator and former Test and One Day International cricketer. He is commonly held as the greatest fielder of all time. He played for the South African cricket team between 1992 and 2003.

The big daddy of modern-day fielding, Jonty was just too fast to be a cricketer of his era. He was so fast that he pulled the entire cricketing world to start aspiring to be agile and swift. While most remember him for his inexplicable and acrobatic catches, he first made a mark on the world stage by running Inzamam out in the World Cup of 1992 (Inzi was a much faster version of himself then).

His speed (nothing short of a world-class sprinter) and willingness to put his body to use saw the beginning of a cult. Watch a Jonty Rhodes innings and you will be surprised if there aren’t extremely fast runs and scrambles. It might not be an exaggeration to say that Rhodes was an athlete who chose to play cricket.

  1.  Ricky Ponting

Ricky Thomas Ponting AO (born 19 December 1974) is an Australian cricket coach, commentator, and former cricketer. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all time. He is considered the most successful captain in international cricket history, with 220 matches won overall from 324 matches with a winning ratio of 67.91%. Ponting was captain of the Australian national team during its 'golden era'; between 2004 and 2011 in Tests and 2002 and 2011 in One Day Internationals (ODIs). He is a specialist right-handed batsman, an excellent slip / close catching fielder, as well as a very occasional bowler. He was named "Cricketer of the Decade 2000"

Even if Ricky Ponting was half as good a batsman as he was, he would make it to most international teams in his era building on the weight of his achievements as a fielder. He flung himself around like he had no bones to worry about, he chased the ball viciously and always showed the audience that he could do more as a fielder.

Amongst the first to make a name as an extremely fast fielder, speed came to his rescue when he lost his touch with the bat. It elevated his game when he was already primed and set to score big. Ponting’s incredible fitness and agility ensured that he would finish with his game as one of the greatest to have ever played.

  1.  Virat Kohli

 born 5 November 1988) is an Indian cricketer who currently captains the India national team. A right-handed top-order batsman, Kohli is regarded as one of the best batsmen in the world. He plays for Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League (IPL), and has been the team's captain since 2013. Since October 2017, he has been the top-ranked ODI batsman in the world and is currently 1st in Test rankings with 928 points. Among Indian batsmen, Kohli has the best ever Test rating (937 points), ODI rating (911 points) and T20I rating (897 points).

To do a Virat Kohli is to blow life into the most incredible of dreams. See him set off for a quick single or see him touch down and take off for a double, you cannot but wonder at the weightlessness he brings to running. As much as his million-dollar shots and an even more valuable mind, his precise placement and unflinching stamina give him a pedestal to stand on.

Kohli adds to cricket’s glory by being a stupendous cricketer who is a supreme athlete. One cannot have enough of him and just as one sees him dart in the in-field, one would see him grin after he’s covered an enormous arc about the boundary and pulled off a priceless catch or a save

  1.  David Warner

David Andrew Warner (born 27 October 1986) is an Australian international cricketer and a former captain of the Australian national team in limited-overs cricket. A left-handed opening batsman, Warner is the first Australian cricketer in 132 years to be selected for a national team in any format without experience in first-class cricket. He plays for New South Wales and the Sydney Thunder in domestic cricket. He served as the Australian vice-captain across Test and ODI formats of the game between 2015 and 2018.

This man rides the thrills of the game coupled with his athletic brilliance. When not muscling the ball over the boundary, he passes time by haring across the pitch to complete near-impossible runs and by demonstrating an astonishing judgment in setting off for those.

On the field, it is a common sight to see him hound after a ball and dive head-first pulling it away from reaching the boundary, extremely successfully. He does it without any fuss and there’s arguably nobody that guards the vastness of an Australian cricket ground booking better than him.

 

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Here are 10 of the fastest in that list, in no particular order.

 

  1. MS Dhoni

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (pronunciation  born 7 July 1981), commonly known as MS Dhoni, is an Indian international cricketer who captained the Indian national team in limited-overs formats from 2007 to 2016 and in Test cricket from 2008 to 2014. Under his captaincy, India won the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, the 2010 and 2016 Asia Cups, the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup and the 2013 ICC Champions Trophy. A right-handed middle-order batsman and wicket-keeper, Dhoni is one of the highest run-scorers in One Day Internationals (ODIs) with more than 10,000 runs scored and is considered an effective "finisher" in limited-overs formats is also regarded by some as one of the best wicket-keepers and captain in modern limited-overs international cricket.

Speed and Dhoni must be first cousins, to sum up their affinity towards each other. For a beefy man, Dhoni pummels the pitch to submission in his all-out hurtles as he converts singles to doubles and further on with unbelievable efficiency. Athletic ability is the bulwark of his game and what makes him special is his diligent fitness regimes to ensure he delays the effects of aging.

In the era where a dive is a pardonable excess, Dhoni’s sure-footed methods behind the stumps and his alacrity in accepting opportunities to squeeze in the extra run have given India the insurance against some of their persistent shortcomings. …and Dhoni clatters away like a train in a great rush!

  1. Andrew Symonds

Andrew Symonds (born 9 June 1975) is a former Australian international cricketer, who played all three formats as a batting all-rounder. He was an important member of two-time World Cup-winning squads. Symonds is a right-handed, middle-order batsman and alternates between medium pace and off-spin bowling. He is also notable for his exceptional fielding skills.

Symonds was built like a truck, but sprinted like a Mustang when he needed to. There were a surge and an unbelievable amount of acceleration that he could impart to himself at the drop of a hat. His hard-hitting strokes and competitive nature shall occupy most of the space is a tribute written to him, but Symonds wouldn’t be the cricketer he was if he wasn’t so fast on the field.

Immense running prowess, imperious dives, cannon-like throws and the belief that the ball beating him was unacceptable made him one of the swiftest men to ever walk onto a cricket field.

  1.  Herschelle Gibbs

Herschelle Herman Gibbs (born 23 February 1974) is a South African former cricketer, who played all formats of the game for fourteen years. A right-handed batsman mostly opened the batting, Gibbs became the first player to hit six consecutive sixes in one over in One Day International (ODI) cricket, doing so against the Netherlands in the 2007 Cricket World Cup.

There are batsmen and there is Gibbs, there are fielders and there too, there is Gibbs. He was the flamboyance that bolstered the confidence of a resurgent Proteas setup. His batting had the callousness of a rock band, his fielding - the precision of a surgeon.

As Shaun Pollock galloped into his delivery stride, Gibbs would be seen prancing in, licking his fingers while his eyes remained set on the ball. He made backward point his backyard - his speed and accuracy meant that a lot of the short and wide garbage that bowlers dished out once in a while had the cover of Gibbs’ impregnable fielding and unassailable speed.

It’s too sad that he is remembered most for having dropped Steve Waugh in the famous semi-final of the 1999 World Cup.

  1.  AB de Villiers

Abraham Benjamin de Villiers (born 17 February 1984), commonly known as AB de Villiers, Mr. 360° or simply AB, is a South African cricketer. He is considered one of the greatest batsmen of all time. He plays for Tshwane Spartans in Mzansi Super League and Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League. In limited-overs cricket he is an attacking batsman.[2] He was named as the ICC ODI Player of the Year three times during his 15-year international career. His name was also featured in Wisden Cricketers of the Decade at the end of 2019.

Can Mr. Omnipotent not be able to do something? When he gave up wicket keeping, De Villiers showed how belligerent he could be while fielding too. He manufactured run-outs from the raw material of impossibility, he plucked the ball suddenly, right as it was about to sail over the boundary, he dived like a swimmer would into a round of heats – all to show the world how incredible a sportsperson he is.

He remains one among the fastest to have ever played the game - be it his strike rate or his speed while chasing a cricket ball.

  1.  Mohammad Kaif

Mohammad Kaif ( pronunciation (help•info)) (born 1 December 1980) is a former Indian cricketer, who played Tests and ODIs.[1] He made it to the national team on the strength of his performances at the Under-19 level, where he captained the India national under-19 cricket team to victory in the Under-19 World Cup in 2000.

A diminutive presence that could easily miss the eye until one saw him in the field was Mohammed Kaif. He ushered the Indian team into an era of great athleticism. Physically frail as he was, his ability to sprint unrelentingly was shocking, as was his eye that never looked away from the ball.

If the ball beat him, it had to be an extremely good shot. If a fielder stopped him from sneaking in a run, he had to be a very good one. His contribution to India’s ODI cricket has been signed yet thoroughly undermined. In a country obsessed with batting and which takes to bowling as a hobby, Kaif holds the rare distinction of earning immense respect plainly through his athleticism on the field.

  1.  Dwayne Bravo

Dwayne John Bravo (born 7 October 1983) is a Trinidadian cricketer, who played all formats of the game and a former captain of West Indies in all formats and plays league cricket for Chennai Super Kings & Quetta Gladiators. A genuine all-rounder, Bravo bats right-handed and bowls right-arm medium-fast pace. He is particularly known for his aggressive batting in the middle order, and for his "at the death" bowling. He is also known for his variety of lengths he can bowl at. He also performs as a singer

Between the frenzied rituals of slower balls, crazy shots, the overt glitz and the dance, Dwayne Bravo does some unimaginable feats on the field of play. He scurries across the outfield, chasing the ball and flinging himself around without a care in the world.

No angle is too obtuse for a Dwayne Bravo humming his version of cricket, be it his shots or be it his fielding. Most batsmen know that there’s no chance of stealing an extra run when dear Dwayne is after the ball. Period.

  1.  Jonty Rhodes

Jonathan Neil Rhodes (born 27 July 1969) is a South African cricket commentator and former Test and One Day International cricketer. He is commonly held as the greatest fielder of all time. He played for the South African cricket team between 1992 and 2003.

The big daddy of modern-day fielding, Jonty was just too fast to be a cricketer of his era. He was so fast that he pulled the entire cricketing world to start aspiring to be agile and swift. While most remember him for his inexplicable and acrobatic catches, he first made a mark on the world stage by running Inzamam out in the World Cup of 1992 (Inzi was a much faster version of himself then).

His speed (nothing short of a world-class sprinter) and willingness to put his body to use saw the beginning of a cult. Watch a Jonty Rhodes innings and you will be surprised if there aren’t extremely fast runs and scrambles. It might not be an exaggeration to say that Rhodes was an athlete who chose to play cricket.

  1.  Ricky Ponting

Ricky Thomas Ponting AO (born 19 December 1974) is an Australian cricket coach, commentator, and former cricketer. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all time. He is considered the most successful captain in international cricket history, with 220 matches won overall from 324 matches with a winning ratio of 67.91%. Ponting was captain of the Australian national team during its 'golden era'; between 2004 and 2011 in Tests and 2002 and 2011 in One Day Internationals (ODIs). He is a specialist right-handed batsman, an excellent slip / close catching fielder, as well as a very occasional bowler. He was named "Cricketer of the Decade 2000"

Even if Ricky Ponting was half as good a batsman as he was, he would make it to most international teams in his era building on the weight of his achievements as a fielder. He flung himself around like he had no bones to worry about, he chased the ball viciously and always showed the audience that he could do more as a fielder.

Amongst the first to make a name as an extremely fast fielder, speed came to his rescue when he lost his touch with the bat. It elevated his game when he was already primed and set to score big. Ponting’s incredible fitness and agility ensured that he would finish with his game as one of the greatest to have ever played.

  1.  Virat Kohli

 born 5 November 1988) is an Indian cricketer who currently captains the India national team. A right-handed top-order batsman, Kohli is regarded as one of the best batsmen in the world. He plays for Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League (IPL), and has been the team's captain since 2013. Since October 2017, he has been the top-ranked ODI batsman in the world and is currently 1st in Test rankings with 928 points. Among Indian batsmen, Kohli has the best ever Test rating (937 points), ODI rating (911 points) and T20I rating (897 points).

To do a Virat Kohli is to blow life into the most incredible of dreams. See him set off for a quick single or see him touch down and take off for a double, you cannot but wonder at the weightlessness he brings to running. As much as his million-dollar shots and an even more valuable mind, his precise placement and unflinching stamina give him a pedestal to stand on.

Kohli adds to cricket’s glory by being a stupendous cricketer who is a supreme athlete. One cannot have enough of him and just as one sees him dart in the in-field, one would see him grin after he’s covered an enormous arc about the boundary and pulled off a priceless catch or a save

  1.  David Warner

David Andrew Warner (born 27 October 1986) is an Australian international cricketer and a former captain of the Australian national team in limited-overs cricket. A left-handed opening batsman, Warner is the first Australian cricketer in 132 years to be selected for a national team in any format without experience in first-class cricket. He plays for New South Wales and the Sydney Thunder in domestic cricket. He served as the Australian vice-captain across Test and ODI formats of the game between 2015 and 2018.

This man rides the thrills of the game coupled with his athletic brilliance. When not muscling the ball over the boundary, he passes time by haring across the pitch to complete near-impossible runs and by demonstrating an astonishing judgment in setting off for those.

On the field, it is a common sight to see him hound after a ball and dive head-first pulling it away from reaching the boundary, extremely successfully. He does it without any fuss and there’s arguably nobody that guards the vastness of an Australian cricket ground booking better than him.